The Economist : Europe
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Poland is cocking up migration in a very European way  15h49 20 février
FOR A GLIMPSE of how immigration is changing Poland, head to Hala Koszyki, an Instagram-friendly food hall in the middle of Warsaw. Take an Uber and there is a good chance the driver will be from Belarus. Inside, Ukrainian waiters and chefs toil over sushi and tapas. Outside, straddling their...
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Emmanuel Macron’s reforms are working, but not for him  15h49 20 février
A BROAD GRIN spreads across Aboubacar Koumbassa’s face as he displays the result of his morning’s class: a tray of oven-hot pains-aux-raisins (currant pastries), which he and his classmates have baked for the first time. The 18-year-old, in a white chef’s cap and apron, had originally hoped for an...
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A sexting scandal makes France fret it is turning Puritan  15h49 20 février
IN MATTERS OF sex and politics, French insouciance rules that the public interest stops at the bedroom door. Presidents have often kept mistresses. Public opinion shrugs off such dalliances. While in office, François Hollande was photographed astride a scooter visiting his lover. In 1899 Félix...
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An Orthodox Christian schism in Ukraine echoes around the world  15h49 20 février
ORTHODOX CHRISTIANS across the globe are bracing themselves for the Lenten fast, a seven-week period of vegan fare and prayer that starts on March 2nd. But few expect this annual ritual to close the rift that runs through eastern Christendom. A dispute that flared a year ago over the proclamation...
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How Sweden copes with Chinese bullying  15h49 20 février
TRADITIONALLY, CHINESE ambassadors are restrained, colourless figures who emerge from the wallpaper only to object ritually that any criticism of their government is an insult to Chinese people. Gui Congyou, China’s ambassador to Sweden, has taken a different tack. He and his embassy denounce...
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The 50bn Yukos judgment against Russia turns on a single word  15h49 20 février
RARELY ARE the ramifications of a four-letter word so great as in the case of Yukos, a defunct Russian oil firm. On February 18th a Dutch appeals court ruled that the Russian state owes Yukos’s shareholders 50bn, one of the largest awards ever, for bankrupting the company using bogus tax-fraud...
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Turkey acquits the Gezi Park protesters, then rearrests one  20h13 19 février
THE FINAL hearing in the trial of the environmental activists was rushed. Throughout the case, the court had failed to scrutinise evidence. So on February 18th, when the judge told the defendants they were acquitted, a stunned courtroom broke out in applause. The relief was short-lived. Ruling...
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Make Europe Boring Again   15h56 13 février
FOR MUCH OF the past decade, if you asked a Eurocrat: What’s on your mind? , the response was usually dramatic. At the start of the decade the euro teetered on the edge of collapse. In the middle of it, Greece came close to being kicked out. A crisis flared when nearly 3m asylum-seekers arrived...
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Angela Merkel’s presumed successor quits as party boss  15h56 13 février
FOREIGN NEWSREADERS might have celebrated. But otherwise there was little to cheer when Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, universally known as AKK thanks to her tongue-twisting name, announced on February 10th that she would resign as leader of Germany’s ruling Christian Democrats (CDU) and not stand as...
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Albin Kurti’s new start in Kosovo  15h56 13 février
THINGS ARE stirring in Kosovo. Since February 3rd this tiny new country has had a dynamic new prime minister, who wants to drive out of politics the guerrillas who fought for independence in the 1990s but then, he says, took to looting the state. Albin Kurti, 44, says his government’s task is to ...
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How Russian show trials expose imaginary plots  15h56 13 février
SIX OR SEVEN men in balaclavas walked into a prison cell in Penza, a provincial Russian town 400 miles (650km) south-east of Moscow. They told their 25-year-old prisoner to undress. They gagged him, tied his legs to a bench and connected wires to his big toes. Then they started to electrocute him. ...
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The struggle to give Brittany its own emoji  15h56 13 février
THE FRENCH foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, is a man of few words and many air miles. When he does comment, it is usually to deplore events in Syria, say, or Iran. But on February 9th the minister let his inner passion get the better of him. The reason? An emoji. The countdown is on Mr Le...
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The parable of the plug  15h51 06 février
THE BRITISH plug is a marvel of design. Its insulated prongs make electric shocks nigh on impossible, even if it is hanging out of the socket. Shutters cover the live holes on the socket until the earth is engaged, meaning even the most adventurous toddlers struggle to electrocute themselves. Yank...
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Why every Norwegian ecowarrior has 200,000 petrodollars  15h51 06 février
SEVERAL TIMES a year neighbours in Norway get together to sweep leaves, trim bushes, weed flowerbeds and fix up their communal areas. These occasions belong to a tradition called dugnad (communal volunteering). Cilia Holmes Indahl says Norway now needs dugnad on a much bigger scale to turn it into...
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The rise of Sinn Fein, an Irish party that once espoused violence  15h51 06 février
NOT SINCE the days of Eamon de Valera has Ireland had a leader as globally recognisable as Leo Varadkar. Both men owe their prominence to vexed Irish relations with Britain. De Valera emerged as the senior surviving leader of the Easter uprising against British rule in 1916. Mr Varadkar rallied EU...